An Open Letter to Alyssa Milano

Dear Ms. Milano,

I am writing to you and to an extent all the signatories of your recent open Letter regarding HB 481 to Georgia Governor Kemp and Speaker Ralston and to anyone else who reads it, but ostensibly, I am writing to you.

First of all. let me begin by saying by saying how I appreciate how passionate and articulate you are. I really do commend you that you took a stand on an issue that you are passionate about and related it to your current work situation. I appreciate how you gathered like minded people in the same situation to express your opinions. Expressing social and political concern is everyone’s responsibility and I for one am glad to see you doing it, regardless of whether I share your concerns or not.

In this world we live in our opinions can often be expressed in hashtags. #HBIsBadforBusiness seems to express yours. I take a differing view. If I had to express myself hashtagedly, I might say #HBisGood4Babies. The bill ,which I hope Governor Kemp signs into law, protects unborn babies at the point that their heartbeat can be recognized. In my mind this shows them to be something different than a part of the mother, to be disposed anyway she sees fit. We may well fundamentally disagree on this point, However a distinct heartbeat is more than adequate medical evidence to make me think that my view is the correct one.

My Dad used to say to me my right to wave my fists in the air ended squarely at his nose. This is how I feel about abortion and reproductive rights. A woman’s reproductive right ends squarely at that cute little babies nose. A fetus with a heartbeat is a far cry from a mass of cells invading a woman’s body. 2 years ago my wife had a mass of cells invading her body. Since it was my wife, my opinion was get those nasty cells out of her body anyway you can. Now, my wife wasn’t pregnant, she had breast cancer and her cancerous cells certainly did not have any chance of ever becoming viable on their own or having their own functioning beating heart.

Ms. Milano, I would not be surprised at all if some of those disagreeing with your and your fellow signatories opinion might propose boycotting your artistic endeavors. I think that’s a bad idea. As strongly as I feel about these issues this does not mean that anyone who disagrees with me needs to be punished economically. I certainly wish you the best in all your endeavors. I hope you in time can come along to my way of thinking that it is babies that need your protection and eloquent defense much more than reproductive freedom ever did,

Dave Roller

Anacrosticversary

A score of years ago, I made a great decision. I married my best friend.  We celebrated the event in many different ways over the past week.  I love her more now than ever before. This an acrostic is chop full of memories and tidbits of  2 decades of Rolleriffic Romance.

             Amy and Dave TLA
         Now where were we?
         No longer newlyweds
Love Interest
         Vim vigor and vitality
         Emma Charlie Lucy
         Rollersteen family est. 1998
         Steen added
         Aunt Eileen and relatively helpful hints
         Roller skating reception
         You Complete me




          
           
Next time: Hippy the Hip Hop Hippo

          

Writers Write.

Hi.  My name is Dave and I used to write a blog called Home School Dad.  I was a full-time educator for 5 to 6 years and before I went back to the 9 to 5 grind, (It’s actually 7 to 5:30 4 days a week, but how much personal information do you really want from me?  Should I text you my ssn? BACK OFF!) I wrote regularly about my family, our journey, and many of my other interests.  Then I stopped.

That’s right, I pretty much stopped writing.  Sure for a year before I turned 50 I wrote a limerick a day and posted it on Facebook.  Yes, once a year at my  Crazy Uncle Dave’s sports blog, I cover Baseball’s hall of fame voting. I did participate in a to z blogging in April for a couple of years, and every 6 months or so, I try to work on the book idea I’ve had for almost 20 years  But the truth is writers write, fish swim and Facebook friends unfriend each other over trivial misunderstandings, so I need to get back on Facebook and start some useless arguments.  Sorry, not the point.  I need to write, and on a  daily basis, even though I have a rewarding, albeit challenging busy life.

I also need to read more. Reading informs and prepares the writer.  I have finished one book this year and that was on January 7th.  I need to make time in the day for it.  I mean how much Netflix can one guy watch?  That’s not a rhetorical question, I need answers!!!!

I’m not sure if this is where I’ll do most of my writing or just where I’ll keep people appraised of my accomplishments.  We shall see.

Next Time: Brain Storming in times of  Drought.

I took a poet to lunch today.

Every day at work my boss my boss titles her group chat by the name of whatever “holiday “it happens to be. Yesterday was take a poet to lunch today. On my break I wrote this poem.

I took a poet to lunch today.

I took a poet to lunch today

And there amid the verse ,

Our flow of thought was free and light 
Not stifled, bland, or terse.
I took a poet to lunch today 
we traded quip for quip
 She scrawled a sonnet on her check 
And left it with her tip.
If you can’t take a poet  to lunch 
Please do not wear a frown 
We all write poems in our own way 
And some , just write them down.

Everybody’s Little Book of Everyday Prayers – A Review

A few weeks ago I received a copy of Everybody’s Little Book of Everyday Prayers by Cynthia MacGregor.  I won the book on Library Thing as part of their Early Reviewers program.  The caveat of receiving the book for free is to review it.

The book is made up of several sections: an introduction,  general prayers,  prayers for specific occasions, and prayers of supplication and thanks. In the introduction, MacGregor shares her ambitious goal of the book …

“This book is for you – whatever your religious affiliation- even if you have no religious affiliation at all. This book is for you, whether you’re a Protestant, Jew or Catholic,   a member of one of the many religions of the world or an unaffiliated believer … This book is for you.

Like I said,  very ambitious.  The problem is the book was not for me.  Nor would I feel good about anyone using it as a guide to praying to God.  I feel bad writing this and wish I felt the book had any utility.  MacGregor is very clear in her introduction that any and all of her prayers could be fashioned to fit someone’s specific belief.  This unfortunately is not true for me.

A prayer from the general prayers section offers a good example of what I mean…

O God you know what is best for me.  You know what is in my heart and what are the things I want in this life for me, for those I love and for this very world itself.  If it is your will, I pray that my wishes and prayers will be granted, but if it is not Your will, then help me to accept my lot in life and Your plan for me, those I hold dear and for all the others whom I pray.

So what’s wrong with that, you might ask? Nothing,  that part is fine. It continues for a few more lines that I mostly agree with and then  …

and may I never rely too heavily on You, but that remember that it is up to me to do whatever I can toward gaining my goals.

What?!!!?!!!?

Didn’t you just say the God knows what is best and knows what is in my heart? To me that means that God is all good and all knowing.  How can we EVER rely too heavily on an all good and all knowing God?

In another prayer in the same section she says   …

“It is said that God created man in His image, yet how dare we assume that we are in any way God-Like?”

The thing is the person who said God was created in His image is actually God, the person this prayer is intended for.

This brings up one of the main issues I have against this book.   In order to appeal to everyone it loses sight of the main reason we pray.  We need God’s help.  The main reason we need God’s help is because we are sinners.  There is no mention of sin in this book, sure it talks about temptation and faults but not sin.  There is no mention of Jesus or a Messiah in this book the Catholics and Christians this book was intended for believe in Jesus and the Jews this book was intended for are still waiting for a Messiah.  When Holidays are mentioned Easter and Passover are not mentioned,  Christmas is only mentioned in prayers for taking down and putting up the Christmas Tree. I understand the author’s desire to be inclusive and not exclusive.  But there is a prayer in the book for paying off your mortgage wasn’t she afraid of offending apartment dwellers?

I hate that I hate this book.  I hoped this book would be written to bring everyone closer to God, but after a careful reading of it, it seems like the author thinks that everyone is okay where they were.  If that was true we would not need to pray.