2019 HOF Returning Players

On Tuesday January 22nd the bbwaa will make their announcement as to who they voted in for the 2019 class of baseball’s hall of fame.  As I do each year I will review the returning players to the ballot.  This year I am introducing a section called final thoughts in which I address my thoughts on pplayers appearing on the ballot for their fianl year of eligibility.

The players returning from last years ballot listed from the highest percentage of votes received to lowest are …

Edgar Martinez 70.4% of the vote in 2018. 10th and final year on the  ballot   Edgar’s  highest % came in 2018. Final Thoughts: He is considered likely for HOF inclusion this year.  

Mike Mussina 63.5%  of the vote in 2018.  6th year on ballot  Mussina’s highest % came in 2018.

Roger Clemens   57.3 % of the vote in 2018. 7th year on the ballot,   Clemens  received his highest %   in 2018,

Barry Bonds  56.4% of the vote in 2018. 7th  year on the ballot,  Bonds received his highest %  in 2018.

Curt Schilling 45% of the vote in 2017. 6th year on the ballot,    Schillings highest % was 52.3 in 2016

Omar Vizquel 37.0% of vote 2nd year on the ballot


Larry Walker 34.1% of the vote in 2018. 9th year on the ballot . Larryreceived his highest percentage of the vote in 2018.

Fred McGriff  23.2 % of the vote in 2018.  10th and final  year on the ballot. Fred’s  highest %  was 23.9 in 2012, his 3rd year on the ballot. Final Thoughts: While I consider the Crime Dog a border line hall of famer, most voters have not.  He hasn’t ever gotten 1/4 of the writers vote and needs 3/4 for inclusion.  Harold Baines making it to Hall through  the veteran’s committee should increase McGriffs vote total, but it wont triple it. 

Manny Ramirez 3nd year on the ballot, voters were just being voters last year when the put Manny on only 22% of their ballots.  Manny’s highes total was in 2017   receiving  23.8% of  votes on his inaugural ballot.


Jeff  Kent 14.5%  of the vote in 2018. 6th year on the ballot  . 2017 was Kent’s highest total to date, receiving 16.7% on his 5th year on the ballot.

Gary Sheffield 11.1% of the vote in 2018. 5th year on ballot. Gary’s highest was 13.3% in 2017 his 4th year on the ballot.

Like Sheffield, Billy Wagner received 11.1 % of the vote in 2018.  This is his 3rd year on the ballot.
2017 was his highest percantage of the vote.

Scott Rolen received 10.2 % of the vote in 2018.. It is his 2nd year on the ballot

Sammy Sosa wnt down to 7.8% of the vote in 2018.  This is his 7th year on the ballot.   In 2012 Sammy received 12.5%, his highest percentage in his first year of consideration.

Andruw Jones  received 7.3% of the vote in 2018. It is 2nd year on the ballot. 

2018 HOF Voting in Review

In 2018 there were 33 former players on the ballot of the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) for consideration into Baseball’s Hall of Fame in Cooperstown New York.  Fourteen had appeared on the 2017 ballot failing to receive at least 75 % of the vote.  Nineteen were appearing for the first time.  No players were on the ballot for their final year of eligibility.  None of the returning player received less than 5% of the vote.  This means that of the 33 players on the ballot they were either elected to the Hall with 75% or more of the vote (4 players), received less than 75% but more than 25% of the vote and have returned to the 2019 ballot ( 15 players), or received lass than 5% of the vote in their initial year and are not on the ballot for 2019 (14 players)

The 4 players who were inducted into the hall of fame on July 29th 2019 were …
(Ihave includerd teir hall of fame induction speeches as an added bonus)
Chipper Jones

Vladimir Guerrero

Jim Thome

Trevor Hoffman

8 of the 14 players who failed to receive 5% of the vote did receive at least one vote.  These players were Carlos Lee,  Livan Hernandez, Kerry Wood, Chris Carpenter, Hideki Matsui, Johnny Damon, Johan Santana and Jamie Moyer.  The 6 who received no votes were Carlos Zambrano, Orlando Hudson, Jason Isringhausen , Aubrey Huff, Kevin Millwood and Brad Lidge.  

I will begin my 2019 HOF coverage in earnest with my next post featuring the 15 players returning to the ballot in 2019. 

Closing the book on 2009

In a few weeks, the 2019 announcements for who the BBWAA selected into the Hall of Fame will be made.  Today begins my first installment into Hall of Fame coverage.  Today and tomorrow I will be looking backward before I look ahead,  In 2018 the book was closed on the Hall of Fame nominees from 2009 the truth is the book was closed long before that due ti the unique circumstances of the 2009 election.

There were 23 names on the 2009 ballot 13 returning to the ballot from previous years and ten on the ballot for the first time.  Due to the unique circumstances, I mentioned above all ten of these new players did not return to the ballot in 2010.  Nine failed to receive 5% of the vote and were taken off subsequent ballots and one was elected on his first ballot and also removed from subsequent ballots.

Ricky Henderson was the player to make the Hall on his first ballot that year receiving 94.8 percent of the vote.  Jim Rice was on the other end of the spectrum that year receiving 76.4 % of the vote in his 15th and final year of eligibility (Eligibility has since been switched to 10 years)

The remaining 12 who returned to the ballot in 2009 came back to the ballot in 2010.  3 of those players were eventually voted into the Hall of fame during their time of eligibility (Andre Dawson 2010 9th year of eligibility, Bert Blyleven 2011 14th year of eligibility, Tim Raines 2017 1oth and final year of eligibility) 4 more players were not elected by the writers but since elected by the veterans committee these are Jack Morris 2018 Alan Trammell 2018 and as I mentioned yesterday Harold Baines 2019 and Lee Smith 2019.  So unless there is further action done by the veterans committee a total of 9 of the 23 candidates for enshrinement in 2009 are in Cooperstown.

Tommy John was on the ballot for the 15th and final time in 2009 receiving 31.7% of the vote, his highest percentage, but not even 1/2 of what was needed for enshrinement.

 Dave Parker, Don Mattingly and Dale Murphy all returned to the ballot in 2010 but all eventually dropped out without ever receiving the votes needed for enshrinement.

The Class of 2009 who appeared on the ballot for their first and only time were (listed in order of votes received)

Rickey Henderson 511 Votes (94.8%)
Mark Grace  22 votes (4.1%)
David Cone 21 Votes (3.9%)
Matt Williams 7 votes (1.3%)
Mo Vaughn 6 Votes (1.1%)
Jay Bell 2 Votes (.4%)
Jesse Orosco 1 Vote (.2%)
Greg Vaughn 0 votes
Ron Gant 0 votes
Dan Pleasac 0 votes.

The book has closed on 2009 Hall of Fame wise,  Tomorrow we will look back at the 2018 bbwaa hall of fame process before we open the book on 2019 on Friday.

Baines and Smith make all my unofficial HOF balloting official

Lee Smith HOF 2019

I was driving home from work on December  when I got floored by unexpected good news.  I was working an overnight weekend job for the holidays and turned my radio on while driving past all the mopes on their way to work. The national news was on and the last story was about the baseball Hall of Fame.  Harold Baines and Lee Smith were both selected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the modern era committee. 

Harold Baines HOF 2019

 This came as both a delight and surprise to me.  Since I began this blog in 2009 there has been no greater advocate to HOF consideration and inclusion for Baines and Smith than myself  Each year in these very pages I pretend I have a vote for the Hall.  Go back into the archives and each year you will see me eloquently persuade the inclusion of either gentleman into the Hall.

Harold Baines  began his career with the White Sox in 1980 and finished his career there as well in 2001.  He had 3 stints with them 1980 to 1989, 1996 and 1997 and then came back in 2000 and retired in 2001.  He also played for the Baltimore Orioles 3 separate times (1993-1995,1997-1998, &2000) In between He played for the Rangers , Athletics and Indians.  Baines was predominantly a right fielder in his first 7 years in the Majors.  From 1988 to 1992 he transitioned to designated hitter  playing some outfield. From 1993 on he was used exclusively as a DH with the exception of one game in right field for the Sox in 1997.

In 1980 while Baines was starting his HOF career on the south side of Chicago, Lee Smith began his HOF journey on the North side with the Cubs.  He played for the Cubs from 1980 to 1987 and then played for the Red Sox from 1988 to 1990, In 1990 he went to St. Louis and was there until mid 1993 when he finished the year with the Yankees. In 1994 He and Baines were teammates in Baltimore.  He finished his career with stints for the angels (1995-1996) Reds (1996) before finishing up with the Expos in 1997.  Smith was a reliever for the vast majority of his career finishing 802 games and earning 478 saves.

I have read several places that Baines and Smith belong in the Hall of Very Good and not the Hall of Fame.  This just does not hold up.  The truth is that they are both Hall of fame caliber in their positions of Designated Hitter and Relief Pitcher.   In baseball reference,com they rank players in similarity.  4 of the 5 players most similar to Baines, Tony Perez, Al Kaline,  Billy Williams & Andre Dawson are Hall of Famers.  Lee Smith best comps to Trevor Hoffman who made the HOF last year and Mariano Rivera, a lock to do so this year. 

Congratulations to both Baines and Smith I look forward to your future enshrinement.

2018 Hall of Fame If I had a ballot

Tomorrow baseball’s Hall of Fame will reveal the results of the Baseball Writers of America Association (BBWAA) ballot as to who will make it to the Hall of fame this year.  This is my 3rd and favoritr annual installment where I pretend that I am a member of that august institution and that my opinion really matters.  The BBWAA allows writers to vote for a many as 10 candidates of eligible  players (this year it is 33).  I like to rank the players how I would vote for them if I were given allowed 13 votes until I was allowed only one vote.  I then reveal how many and who I would vote for if I were choosing just base on who I thought was hall of fame worthy.

If I were allowed 13 votes, unlucky 13 would go to someone who had his share of both good and bad luck in his career, Kerry Wood.  Wood debuted for the Cubs on April 12, 1998 Easter Sunday.  It was the day after I got married.  Shortly after that he had a 20 strikeout game on his was to being Rookie of the Year.  His injury plagued career had him make the transition from starter to reliever and the injuries kept him from the Hall of Fame type career we imagined for him in those early years.  However, I think that he is deserving of a mention, so I give it to him here.

Last year my 11th vote went to Gary Sheffield, this year he has dropped to 12th.  Sheffield’s name has generated much debate amongst writers and fans on his worthiness for the Hall.  Last year I said there were too many question marks about Sheffield to consider him higher than 11th.  So it should not be surprising at all that he’d drop a notch this year.

In 2016 in his 3rd year of Eligibility, I placed Mike Mussina 11th on my ballot.  Last year je went up to 9th.  I have moved him back down to 11th this year.  A lot of people I respect think this is a hall of fame pitcher,  1/2 way through the ballot process, I do not.

If I were allowed to vote for exactly 10 players, my 10th vote would go to Jeff Kent.  10th is exactly where I placed Kent last year.  To me Kent is a very good player but I see him ultimately missing out of enshrinement to Cooperstown.

I am a Chicago guy and I see my role as a Chicago guy to bring Chicago players to the attention of those who may not have seen them play regularly.  With that in mind, my 9th vote goes to Carlos Lee.  Not only does he have one of the greatest nicknames of all time, El Caballo was a pure power hitter and a joy to watch.  He’s been wavering for me between 8th and eleventh but his early years for the White Sox have him sticking out at 9th.  

Last year Trevor Hoffman was unlucky 13th on my Hall of Fame list.  Why he was so low could be summed up in two words: Lee Smith.  Smith was  ‘on his fifteenth and final year on the ballot and as my Brother in Law famously said some years ago ‘If Lee Smith doesn’t get in ain’t nobody should get in.”  The BBWAA decided that Smith is not hall of fame worthy, so in my logic if Smith the superior reliever is not worthy neither is Hoffman.  Fortunately for Hoffman my logic is not being followed by the writers.  This year I’ve relented a little and placed Hoffman 8th on my list.

Like last year, My 7th choice on a 7 player ballot would be Fred McGriff.  Like Carlos Lee, McGriff has a Hall of fame nickname, but The Crime Dog for me is just on the outside  edge of the Hall of Fame.  I will give him a hard and long look next year in his final go round and perhaps even the benefit of the doubt on next year’s ballot. 

If I could vote for only 6 players on the 2018 ballot.  Larry Walker would be that 6th player.  Larry has been going up in my estimation over the past few years (He was my 8th choice last year.)  I think at least in my mind , the time is coming that writers should consider his solid case for enshrinement.

If I could vote for as many or as few players in the Hall of Fame this year as I thought were truly deserving of such an honor, that number would be 5.  My Official Unofficial Ballot (OUB) would contain 5 names, the 5th name would be Omar Vizquel.  Vizquel is among 3 players on the ballot for the first time this year who are also on my OUB.  Some say Vizquel just does not have the offensive stats to garner enshrinement in Cooperstown.  Those who say that don’t understand what an awesome shortstop and student of the game he was.  I say he is very deserving of Cooperstown and I plan to plead his case for as long as it takes to get him there.

If it was decided that only 4 players could adorn my 2018 ballot, The 4tth name on that ballot would be Edgar Martinez.  (Edgar was 5th on my list of players last year.)  I have changed my tune on Edgar over the past few years as many official voters have so I think if not this year Martinez should make it to Cooperstown very soon.

If I was given a HOF ballot and told to vote for only 3 players, the 4th player would be Vladimir Guerrero.  He was 4th on my OUB  in his first year of eligibility and my gut said he would not be a 1st ballot hall of famer.  My gut is saying this year that he will be a 2nd ballot one.

If I could only vote for 2 players this year, my 2nd vote would go to Chipper Jones.  Jones played only for Atlanta for his distinguished career and is extremely deserving of being enshrined his first chance out of the gate.

My wife is convinced that Jim Thome ruined the White Sox.  No matter what I say to her, I cannot talk her out of such foolishness.  That being said there is no kind of foolishness that can keep the pride of Peoria, Illinois out of the Hall of Fame.  The 2006 comeback player of the year with the White Sox is who I would vote for this year even If I could only vote for one player.

Whew!!! That was a lot of fun but also hard work.  Now a little bit more guesswork.  I think that tomorrow 4 or 5 players will be announced as getting 75 % or more of the votes needed for enshrinement.  If it is 5 that will be tied with the most ever with the original Hall of fame class that included Babe Ruth.  If it were 5 , I think it will be Vladimir Guerrero , Trevor Hoffman, Chipper Jones,  Edgar Martinez and Jim Thome.  If it is 4, and I think it will be 4, Martinez would just narrowly miss out.